EC2 Reserved Instance Reporting

The EC2 Reserved instance reports serve to help you keep track of your Reserved Instance usage and ensure that your reserved instances are being utilized to their fullest potential. We have also created recommendation reports designed around getting the most out of your AWS usage while saving you money in the process.

Summary

The EC2 Reserved Instances Summary Report provides a high-level overview of the Reserved Instances purchased within your AWS account. This report helps you match your purchased Reserved Instances with EC2 usage. It is important to manage the number of unused and recommended Reserved Instances.

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Summary:

EC2 RI summary

  • Total Reserved Instances – the reserved instances across all regions.
  • Total Active Reserved Instances – the number of reserved instances that have been purchased and are available for use.
  • Total Retired Reserved Instances – the number of reserved instances that have expired and cannot be used.
  • Total Reserved Instances Not Being Used – the number of reserved instances that have been purchased but are not being used by any running EC2 instances.
  • Total On-Demand Instances Not Using Reserved Instance – the number of instances that are launched as On-Demand and are not using a reserved instance.

Reserved Instance Volume Discounts: Shows how close you are to reaching one of the reserved instance volume discounts offered by AWS.  The volume discounts are triggered when $250,000 in up-front fees per region are incurred.

ec2 RI discount

  • Total Upfront Fees – the total you’ve spend on upfront reserved instance fees.
  • Region – the region the fees were incurred.
  • Upfront Discount – the discount percentage on upfront fees you have achieved.
  • Hourly Discount – the discount percentage on hourly fees you have achieved.

Reserved Instances by Region: Shows how many reserved instances have been purchased within each region.

ec2 ri by region

  • Region – the geographic location where the reserved instances were purchased.
  • Instances – the total reserved instances purchased within that region.

Reserved Instances by Size: This chart shows your instances broken out by size. 

ec2 ri instance by size

  • Size- the size of the instance ex. t2.micro, m1.small
  • Instances- The Total number of instances of that size

Reserved Instances by Utilization: This chart shows your instances broken out by utilization type. 

ec2 RI by utilization

  • Utilization Type- The utilization type of the reservation
  • Instances- The total number of instances of that reservation type

Please note: Amazon no longer offers Medium or Light utilization types. However you may still see them located on this chart.

Reserved Instances by Account: This shows the breakdown of total reserved instances by account. 

ec2 ri by region

  • Account- The account which the Reserved Instances are associated with
  • Instances- The total number of instances belonging to that account

List of Reserved Instances

This report gives you a complete list of your Reserved EC2 Instances. We include many options in this report from filtering down to the exact data you need, the ability to export to both CSV and PDF and valuable information about your reserved EC2 Instances.

list of ec2 reserved instance

Purchase Recommendation (by Instance)  and (by Frequency) Reports

This report shows the possible cost savings of optimal Reserved Instance usage. It provides a complete list of recommended Reserved Instances to purchase and demonstrates the cost and savings of each. You can choose to display the costs based on a 1 or 3 year Reserved Instance purchase using the dropdown. The recommended Reserved Instance type (Light, Medium, Heavy) is based on current usage.

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CloudCheckr offers two distinct Reserved Instance purchase recommendation reports.  One is based on running Instances and the other based on Frequency Distribution by time for Instance Types.

The report “by instance” looks at each instance to determine if you should purchase an RI for the individual instance. The report “by frequency” looks at how many EC2 instances are running by instance type, zone, and platform, for each hour and determines the optimal Reserved Instance purchase. Most typically, static environments in which instances are provisioned and running for longer periods of time it is easiest to use the EC2 RI Purchase Recommendations (by Instance) report. For environments in which auto scaling is heavily used, or instances are started, stopped, and terminated regularly, it is more appropriate to use the EC2 RI Purchase Recommendations (by Frequency) report.


USING THE RESERVED INSTANCE REPORTS

CloudCheckr will build its Reserved Instance reports within all accounts. However, the data within the reports will be dependent on whether the account is the AWS Consolidated PAYER account or a PAYEE account.

When viewing the reports within a Payee account you will see all the data specific to that account only.

When viewing the reports within the Payer account you will see totals and usage from all accounts in the consolidated family that have been added to CloudCheckr.

NOTE: If CloudCheckr does not have access to any of the accounts within the Consolidated family, you will see a list of the inaccessible AWS accounts within the Reserved Instance reports within the payer account.  It is highly recommended that you add these missing accounts for accurate reporting and recommendations.


REPORT SUMMARY

The Summary section of the report provides you with key statistics highlighting your current Reserved Instance usage, as well as the predicted cost benefits of implementing CloudCheckr’s purchase recommendations.

  • Recommended Reserved Instance Purchases – Total number of Reserved Instances we recommend to purchase
  • Total Instance Count for Active Reservations -Total instance count for all Active Reserved Instances already purchased
  • Possible Monthly Savings – Monthly savings to convert all instances to Reserved Instances based on Utilization recommendations
  • Total Upfront Cost – Cost of converting all On-Demand instances to Reserved Instances based on Utilization recommendations
  • Months to Break Even – Number of months before cost savings will be greater than upfront cost
  • Total Monthly Savings Over 1 Year (less upfront cost)- The total monthly savings times the number of months less the upfront cost
  • Total Savings Over 1 Year – Monthly Savings * number of months less the upfront cost
  • Return On Investment – Percentage return on the upfront cost

RECOMMENDED PURCHASES

This section of the report provides the actual Reserved Instance purchase recommendations, organized by Availability Zone, Instance Type, Platform and Tenancy. The recommendations are ordered by Total Savings, descending.

To make these purchase recommendations, CloudCheckr looks at the EC2 activity by instance type, zone, and platform, for each hour.  Based on this data, it calculates the optimal number of Reserved Instances you should purchase to have the lowest possible costs.

You will find the following information for each recommendation:

  • Availability Zone – the availability zone where the purchase should be made.
  • Instance Type – the size of the instance for the recommendation.
  • Platform – the operating system.
  • Tenancy- Whether an instance is the default tenancy or a reserved tenancy.
  • Costs – this section contains the following key statistics for each recommendation:
    • Current Monthly Cost: how much you are currently paying, over 30 days, for this instance type and platform within this availability zone.
    • Optimal Monthly Cost: the lowest monthly cost you could achieve with optimal Reserved Instance utilization.
    • Upfront Cost: the total upfront cost for purchasing all recommended reservations.
    • Monthly Savings: the savings, over a 30 day period, for optimal Reserved Instance utilization over what you are currently paying.
    • Break Even: total number of months before cost savings will be greater than upfront cost.
    • Total Savings: the total savings over a 12 or 36 month period (depending on your selection), including the upfront fees, versus what you are currently paying.
    • Return On Investment: percentage return on the upfront cost to purchase the recommended number of Reserved Instances.

Clicking the green plus symbol (+) to the left of each recommendation will expand that selection, displaying a 30-day trending graph.

This trending graph plots the total number of that type of instance that ran each hour for the last month.  CloudCheckr’s Reserved Instance recommendations will be overlayed on top of the graph providing a graphical representation of your recommendations.


RECOMMEND YOU DO NOT PURCHASE RESERVED INSTANCES

This section of the report, which provides all of the same information as the purchase recommendations, provides information for each Availability Zone, Instance Type, Platform and Tenancy grouping that you should not purchase reservations for at this time.

This could be because running On-Demand is less expensive than Reserved, or because you already have purchased the optimal number of reservations.

Comparison Summary Report

This report provides an analysis of what your running EC2 instances would cost under the various pricing models. The numbers are calculated to show what the prices would be to convert all EC2 instances to the different pricing types.

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The EC2 Cost Comparison Summary Report will show you how much you would spend, were you to move all of your EC2 instances to a each price type. It shows how much you would pay if all instances were spot, on-demand, 1 year reservations, or 3 year reservations (including pricing for light, medium, and heavy utilization).

NOTE: The costs on the report do not include EBS volumes, snapshots, data in and out, etc., only the cost to run the instances themselves.

CostSum

Cost Comparison for EC2 Pricing Types: this chart reflects the total price to run the instances for a 3 year period, and assumes 100% utilization.

  • Convert All Instances to Pricing Type – this column shows the various EC2 price types available in AWS: on-demand, reserved light, medium, and heavy 1 year commitment, reserved light, medium, and heavy 3 year commitment, and spot pricing.
  • Upfront Cost – when purchasing a reserved instance, users must pay an upfront fee in exchange for the lowered hourly cost.  Instances purchased using on-demand or spot instances do not incur upfront fees.
  • Monthly Recurring Costs – the total price paid, over 30 days, to run each EC2 instance at a price point.  This price assumes the instances are running 24 hours a day for those 30 days.
  • Month to Break-Even – shows the number of months it would take to recoup the upfront investment in a reserved instance versus simply purchasing an on-demand instance.
  • Total Cost – the total cost to run the instance for a 3 year period.  This total includes any applicable upfront fees for reserved instances.

When reviewing the totals in this chart, it is important to understand a few key points:

While the price of running a Heavy Utilization Reserved Instance is generally very low, you will be charged an hourly rate for that reservation regardless of whether it is being used.  The other price types, including on-demand and spot, do not incur any fees while an instance is stopped or if a reservation is unused.

Spot pricing is typically much less expensive than on-demand and reserved, but is not always the best choice.  The hourly cost of spot instances fluctuates frequently.  When launching a spot instance, you must set a maximum bid for the instance, which is the most you’re willing to pay for the instance.  If the current price of the instance rises above your maximum bid, your spot instances will automatically terminate.  It’s recommended that you never run anything on a spot instance that cannot be temporarily shut down.

The most effective pricing model usually involves different price types.  To keep costs low, on-demand instances should be avoided whenever possible.  Instances that will be used for several months should be purchased as reserved instances.  Those that run non-time-critical back-end processes should be purchased as spot instances.

Comparison Detail Report

This report shows you what the cost would be to convert from your current Instance pricing type to the other available pricing types.

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The EC2 Cost Comparison Detail Report shows how much you would spend, were you to move each of your EC2 instances to the various pricing types in AWS. It shows how much you would pay for an instance were it spot, on-demand, 1 year reservation, or 3 year reservation (including pricing for light, medium, and heavy utilization).

NOTE: The costs on the report do not include EBS volumes, snapshots, data in and out, etc., only the cost to run the instances themselves.

Each EC2 instance is displayed separately in the report, showing the instance ID, Platform, Size, and the region the instance resides in.

When expanding the details on an instance, you will see its pricing chart.   All information in the chart reflects the total price to run the instance for a 3 year period.  The price totals assume 100% utilization.

  • Pricing Type – this column shows the various EC2 price types available in AWS: on-demand, reserved light, medium, and heavy 1 year commitment, reserved light, medium, and heavy 3 year commitment, and spot pricing.
  • Upfront Cost – when purchasing a reserved instance, users must pay an upfront fee in exchange for the lowered hourly cost.  Instances purchased using on-demand or spot instances do not incur upfront fees.
  • Monthly Recurring Costs – the total price paid, over 30 days, to run the EC2 instance at a price point.  This price assumes the instance is running 24 hours a day for those 30 days.
  • Months to Break-Even – shows the number of months it would take to recoup the upfront investment in a reserved instance versus simply purchasing an on-demand instance.
  • Total Cost – the total cost to run the instance for a 3 year period.  This total includes any applicable upfront fees for reserved instances.

The current price type of the instance will be highlighted in green.

When reviewing the totals in this chart, it is important to understand a few key points:

While the price of running a Heavy Utilization Reserved Instance is generally very low, you will be charged an hourly rate for that reservation regardless of whether it is being used.  The other price types, including on-demand and spot, do not incur any fees while an instance is stopped or if a reservation is unused.

Spot pricing is typically much less expensive than on-demand and reserved, but is not always the best choice.  The hourly cost of spot instances fluctuates frequently.  When launching a spot instance, you must set a maximum bid for the instance, which is the most you’re willing to pay for the instance.  If the current price of the instance rises above your maximum bid, your spot instances will automatically terminate.  It’s recommended that you never run anything on a spot instance that cannot be temporarily shut down.

The most effective pricing model usually involves different price types.  To keep costs low, on-demand instances should be avoided whenever possible.  Instances that will be used for several months should be purchased as reserved instances.  Those that run non-time-critical back-end processes should be purchased as spot instances.